Dark Matter 1

In physics, matter is anything that has mass and takes up space by having volume. Matter usually includes everything that is made of atoms or subatomic particles that act as if they have mass and volume. A photon is an elementary particle without mass, which is why it always travels at the speed of light in a vacuum. A photon is not considered matter. Matter does not include other energy phenomena such as light or sound.

There are various phases or states of matter. The classical and familiar phases of matter are solid, liquid, and gas. Other possible states include plasma, quark–gluon plasma, Bose–Einstein condensates, and fermionic condensates. So what is the predominant kind of matter in our universe?

Types of galaxies whose shape is formed largely due to dark matter.

Dark matter is hypothesized to account for eighty five percent of our universe’s matter. It is thought to account for about a quarter of the universe’s matter/energy density. Dark matter, like many phenomena in physics, can not be seen. Consider it to be one of many phenomena that plays on scales much bigger or smaller than the relatively narrow scope human genes evolve to promote themselves within. 

Artist rendition of dark matter (depicted blue) abundance throughout our galaxy.

Dark matter does not absorb, reflect, or emit electromagnetic radiation. Matter that doesn’t interact with the electromagnetic field is extremely difficult to detect. In fact, dark matter’s existence is hypothesized largely through inference and deduction. Certain gravitational and other astrophysical anomalies do not make sense without the inclusion of dark matter. For example, galaxies as we understand them, their calculations, their shape, and their movements, would fly apart if one didn’t account for vast amounts of unseen matter. 

Dark matter does not absorb, reflect, or emit electromagnetic radiation. Matter that doesn’t interact with the electromagnetic field is extremely difficult to detect. In fact, dark matter’s existence is hypothesized largely through inference and deduction. Certain gravitational and other astrophysical anomalies do not make sense without the inclusion of dark matter. For example, galaxies as we understand them, their calculations, their shape, and their movements, would fly apart if one didn’t account for vast amounts of unseen matter. 

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